Jamaica National Heritage Trust -  Pedro Bank - Jamaica

Documents and Forms

Atlas of Cultural Heritage and Infrastructure of the Americas.

The cultural heritage of Latin America and the Caribbean unites and distinguishes us as a region. It also represents a strategic resource for sustainable development with conditions of social inclusion, access and participation in terms of equality. It is a regional and national identity factor that gives us a presence in the international arena with a voice and a face of our own.

Atlas of Cultural Heritage and Infrastructure of the Americas.

The Atlas of Cultural Heritage and Infrastructure of the Americas: Jamaica, represents one of the first steps of an innovative tool that will provide comparable information continental-wide. Thanks to this innovative system, in-depth data will be available for the different countries of the region on a broad range of topics. The Atlas will therefore be a fundamental tool for decision making, and for uncovering the potential of the Latin America and Caribbean cultural heritage.

Protected Areas System Plan: Jamaica

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The Protected Areas Committee is now inviting feedback on the current draft of the Protected Areas
System Master Plan (PASMP). Stakeholders and interested parties may provide their feedback in
one or both of the following ways:

1. Participation in a consultation
2. Written submissions

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Design Guidelines For The Historic District Of Falmouth

The Tainos

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Taino Day - Celebrating the first Jamaicans

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Great Jamaicans Project - Part One

This series we will focus on Jamaicans, many lesser known, who have made an impact in their respective fields. Part 1 will highlight three individuals who have made a mark in the areas of activism and law. Of note are John Russwurm, Hector Josephs and Robert Sutherland.

Great Jamaicans Project - Part Two

This series we will focus on Jamaicans, many lesser known, who have made an impact in their respective fields. Part One highlighted three individuals who made a mark in the areas of activism and law - John Russwurm, Hector Josephs and Robert Sutherland. Part Two will highlight two other noteworthy individuals: Harold Moody and Rosemary Brown.

Labour Day: A Movement of Liberalization to a Celebration of Volunteerism

The international Labour Day movement was first born out of a struggle to free workers who suffered under extreme conditions of repression, exploitation and racism during the nineteenth century. Since its birth in 1980, many countries have set aside the 1st of May in honour of the Labour movement. In Jamaica however, Labour Day is celebrated on the 23rd of May.

Jamaican Enslaved Africans as Economic Producers

Historians of Jamaican history often portray enslaved Africans as revolutionaries who resisted their enslavement. But this is only a small part of the story. Slaves in Jamaica were also industrious producers who traded in agricultural goods.. During enslavement owners and managers of estates in the British Caribbean realized that creative measures were needed to feed the slave population (Mintz, 2003). It was argued that allowing enslaved Africans to grow their own produce would reduce the island’s dependence on imports.

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World War I Monuments of Jamaica

One hundred years ago the world witnessed the end of one of the bloodiest military conflicts witnessed by humankind known as The Great War or World War I (1914-1918). Over a thousand Jamaican men participated in this war on the side of the victorious British Empire and her allies including France, the United States, Belgium and Italy among others. Despite being on the side of the victors just over a thousand died while many others sustained physical and other forms of injury. The remains of those who perished were never returned home and where they could be found were buried in places far away from Jamaica such as Europe, North Africa and the Middle East.

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The Earthquake of 1907

The 1907 Earthquake Monument is built over the graves of about five hundred and one (501) victims and stands as a lasting reminder of the earthquake which severely damaged the capital city of Kingston in 1907. As the clock struck 3:30pm on Monday, January 14, 1907, the earth began to shake. The quake, which lasted exactly thirty-six (36) seconds, with a magnitudinal scale of 6.5, caused over one thousand (1,000) of Kingston’s inhabitants to perish and many others died as a result of fires triggered by the earthquake. The Gleaner reported the following morning that, "hundreds of bodies were found burnt and charred along the principal streets of Kingston."

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Remembrance of the Great Earthquake

On the morning of June 7, 1692, the city of Port Royal experienced a massive earthquake that claimed the lives of approximately 2000 people and caused 33 acres (66 percent) of the city to sink into the Caribbean Sea. Adding to the obvious catastrophe of destroyed buildings and loss of lives there was a public sanitation emergency as the quakes uprooted dead bodies and bones from graves which covered the harbour. The magnitude of this quake created a rippling effect as a tsunami swept the city’s floor taking with it ships from shorelines and causing more destruction to the remaining buildings.

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Remembrance of the Great Earthquake

On the morning of June 7, 1692, the city of Port Royal experienced a massive earthquake that claimed the lives of approximately 2000 people and caused 33 acres (66 percent) of the city to sink into the Caribbean Sea. Adding to the obvious catastrophe of destroyed buildings and loss of lives there was a public sanitation emergency as the quakes uprooted dead bodies and bones from graves which covered the harbour. The magnitude of this quake created a rippling effect as a tsunami swept the city’s floor taking with it ships from shorelines and causing more destruction to the remaining buildings.

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Commemorating the 127th anniversary of the birth of the Rt. Excellent Norman Washington Manley

Norman Washington Manley was born on July 4, 1893. He was christened at the Porus Methodist Church on September 17 of that same year. Manley was an immensely talented individual. Not only was he a founding member and president of the Peoples National Party, but also an athlete, soldier, lawyer, social justice advocate and community builder.

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The African Presence at Seville

The first Africans came to Jamaica with the Spanish. Juan de Esquivel (the first Spanish governor), along with 60 to 80 colonists, established the first Spanish settlement at Sevilla la Nueva in 1509.

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Commemoration of the 133rd Anniversary of the Birth of the Rt. Excellent Marcus Mosiah Garvey

Jamaica’s first National Hero, Marcus Mosiah Garvey, was born on August 17, 1887 to parents Marcus Garvey Snr and Sarah Jane Richards in the parish of St. Ann.

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Remembering ‘Miss Lou’ September 7, 1919 to July 26, 2006

The Most Honourable Louise Bennett-Coverley OM, OJ, MBE, HON. D. LITT (Miss Lou) is possibly Jamaica’s most loved personality. Public figures are often controversial, but in the minds of many Jamaicans, she is without flaw. Revered for her effortless use of both the English language and the Jamaican Creole, not only was this woman of substance a world class poet, but scores also remember her for her formidable commentaries.

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Remembering the Morant Bay Uprising

The Morant Bay War of 1865 changed the course of Jamaica’s history forever

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SHOWCASE
FORTS

Ever since the capture of Jamaica by the English from the Spanish in 1655, the need for fortification became immediate because of the...

 

SHOWCASE
COURTHOUSES

The Morant Bay Courthouse, which was destroyed by fire on Monday, February 19, 2007, is an important part of St. Thomas's history.

 

SHOWCASE
HISTORIC SCHOOLS

Built in 1885 of masonry and timber, the Simms building exhibits a combination of Gothic and Georgian features; the projecting...